Local Sourcing

TBL Plc is committed to increasing locally sourced material and currently sources 74% of its materials locally. This is equivalent to Tzs. 130bn p.a.

TBL Plc currently sources 61%
of its raw materials locally.

This is equivalent to
Tzs. 48bn
This is equivalent to Tzs. 48bn

TBL Plc currently sources 61%
of its raw materials locally.

This is equivalent to
Tzs. 48bn

TBL Plc currently sources 85% of
its packaging materials locally.

This is equivalent to
Tzs. 82bn
This is equivalent to Tzs. 82bn

TBL Plc currently sources 85% of
its packaging materials locally.

This is equivalent to
Tzs. 82bn

TBL Plc currently sources 62% of
its goods and services from local
suppliers & transporters.

This is equivalent to
Tzs. 301bn
This is equivalent to Tzs. 301bn

TBL Plc currently sources 62% of
its goods and services from local
suppliers & transporters.

This is equivalent to
Tzs. 301bn
28,000

Retail owners in Tanzania
are partners of TBL Plc.

Retail owners in Tanzania are partners of TBL Plc. | People impacted (direct/indirect).
566,000

People impacted
(direct/indirect).

Smart Agriculture

TBL Plc is an active player in the agriculture value chain. The main raw materials that the company uses in the production of its products are: Sorghum, barley, maize and grapes.

Sorghum Agriculture Programme: TBL Plc collaborated with the World Food Program and the Farm to Market Alliance to support smallholder sorghum farming in Tanzania. The collaboration kicked off with a pilot project in January 2020 where, TBL Plc agreed to purchase the sorghum produced by 2,000 smallholder sorghum farmers in Dodoma and Manyara. TBL Plc, FtMA and WFP support the farmers with access to sorghum seed; crop insurance; sorghum crop management protocols; agricultural extension services; and improved aggregation and market access to maximize their harvest. To date, 2000 farmers have produced yields that were approximately 70% better than the previous year.

Sustainability

TBL – TARI: TBL Plc and the Tanzania Agricultural Research Institution (TARI) had partnered to conduct a research project that aimed to improve the quality of sorghum seeds in Tanzania. Sorghum seeds grown through good agricultural practices (GAP) proved to have a higher yield of around 43% better that those grown through other conditions.